8 cylinder front engine iconic vehicle
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By maddog2020
#135548
There are 2 different 928 cam tool sets. there is the 9226 which comes with the saddles to bolt the cams down, the threaded studs that allow you to bolt them down to the heads and a couple of plates to time the cams. These are documented for the early 32v engines, and then there is the 9248 which are just the saddles, and are supposed to be used on the S4 and later engines.

do the early 32v heads have different cam spacing than the S4 and later heads? I've never had one of each to compare
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By worf
#135553
maddog2020 wrote: Wed Feb 23, 2022 9:21 am There are 2 different 928 cam tool sets. there is the 9226 which comes with the saddles to bolt the cams down, the threaded studs that allow you to bolt them down to the heads and a couple of plates to time the cams. These are documented for the early 32v engines, and then there is the 9248 which are just the saddles, and are supposed to be used on the S4 and later engines.

do the early 32v heads have different cam spacing than the S4 and later heads? I've never had one of each to compare

Are you asking if you can use the 9248 saddles on an S3?

I am 99.99% certain the answer is yes. Why else would it be possible for people to cut the ends off the S3 cams and use them in 87+ heads?

I am 100% that I don’t like those factory-tool cam saddles. I’ve used them according to the WSM, then according to WSM with additional “sense” and came to the conclusion that they are a time waster even if you use them correctly with additional “sense.”
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By maddog2020
#135556
I know the cam shafts are the same diameter, I don't know if the spacing distance between the intake and exhaust cams are the same. I'm guessing not since Porsche sells saddles for both.


for installing factory cams, the easiest way is to just install the cam caps and slowly tighten them down alternating between the caps. The only reason I like using them is that when I'm setting up non stock cams it is easier to get the cams timed properly as they don't have the tick marks on them like the factory ones. so my process is to get the exhaust cams installed and dialed in, with the chains loose (not on the sprockets, then get the intake cams dialed in and marked, then remove the saddles, swap in the tensioner and then check again before installing the cam caps on the intake cams. I will definitely permanently mark the cams this time around.
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By worf
#135559
Now that I'm into my second cup of coffee…

I think you’ve got the tools “inverted.”

The 9226 saddles and lobe templates are for the S3. The S4 tool is the lobe template only AFAIK. I’ve only ever heard of saddles with the S3 “kit.” Pretty sure the 9248 is just the lobe templates and that you only get saddles with the 9226.

In any case I am 100% certain that I used the saddles from the 9226 on S4 cams since I was not able to acquire a 9248 set and stopped looking for one at least 10 years ago.
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By worf
#135560
maddog2020 wrote: Wed Feb 23, 2022 9:56 am for installing factory cams, the easiest way is to just install the cam caps and slowly tighten them down alternating between the caps.
I always install the cams with the lobe pressure as much as possible on the two inner cylinder’s lifters. If you do this then the front cam bridge is essentially irrelevant for purposes of getting the cams bolted. But, that doesn’t really help you if you’re messing with indexing on non-stock cams.
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By Stepson
#135896
worf wrote: Wed Feb 23, 2022 10:13 am
I think you’ve got the tools “inverted.”
Dundertaker told me to never get my tool "inverted. " Something about being extremely painful. :hiding:
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By worf
#135910
Stepson wrote: Thu Feb 24, 2022 3:58 pm Dundertaker told me to never get my tool "inverted. " Something about being extremely painful. :hiding:
There are certain positions in which it is quite necessary to invert your tool to perform the required motion.

Everting your tool, however, is not recommended in any circumstances.
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By Stepson
#136046
worf wrote: Thu Feb 24, 2022 5:41 pm There are certain positions in which it is quite necessary to invert your tool to perform the required motion.
Everting your tool, however, is not recommended in any circumstances.
Believe you me, I am never everting MY tool. LOL

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